Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

           

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

What's In Season

Red cabbage is the more colorful sister to green cabbage. The flavor is earthy and richer than green cabbage, making it a great complement to vinegary slaws. Traditionally used in Asian cuisines, sesame oils and rice vinegars are ideal complements to the cabbage’s robust flavor. When choosing a cabbage, you’ll want it to be heavy and tight, but will likely discard the first layer of leaves (or save them for soup if you’re focused on reducing waste) as they wilt more quickly. Red cabbage is rich in potassium and beta-carotene, which is rich in antioxidants. Click through for recipe ideas!

Red cabbage is the more colorful sister to green cabbage. The flavor is earthy and richer than green cabbage, making it a great complement to vinegary slaws. Traditionally used in Asian cuisines, sesame oils and rice vinegars are ideal complements to the cabbage’s robust flavor. When choosing a cabbage, you’ll want it to be heavy and tight, but will likely discard the first layer of leaves (or save them for soup if you’re focused on reducing waste) as they wilt more quickly. Red cabbage is rich in potassium and beta-carotene, which is rich in antioxidants. Click through for recipe ideas!

The Purple Muu radish is also known as a Korean, Lo Bok, and Moo radish. Like a Daikon, it is larger than most other radishes and is mild with a hint of spice. The flesh is a light, creamy purple. Eaten raw, the Mu radish is rife with fiber, vitamin C, and carotene. But it’s most commonly used as the key ingredient for Kimchi, a spicy, fermented slaw, which is said to aid in digestive health. Try your hand at homemade Kimchi or simply toss with apple cider vinegar that adds a subtle tanginess. Click through for recipe ideas!

The Purple Muu radish is also known as a Korean, Lo Bok, and Moo radish. Like a Daikon, it is larger than most other radishes and is mild with a hint of spice. The flesh is a light, creamy purple. Eaten raw, the Mu radish is rife with fiber, vitamin C, and carotene. But it’s most commonly used as the key ingredient for Kimchi, a spicy, fermented slaw, which is said to aid in digestive health. Try your hand at homemade Kimchi or simply toss with apple cider vinegar that adds a subtle tanginess. Click through for recipe ideas!

When you cut into a chioggia beet, you may question whether you accidentally bought radishes. The interior is striped white and magenta, with a ruby colored exterior that leans a little lighter than a traditional beet. They’re aptly nicknames the candy stripe beet, which refers to both its colors and flavor. Roasting brings out the strongest flavor in the beets, but feel free to steam, braise, or eat them raw. They’re the perfect complement to a variety of cheeses, eggs, bacon, oranges, herbs, and more. Click through for recipe ideas!

When you cut into a chioggia beet, you may question whether you accidentally bought radishes. The interior is striped white and magenta, with a ruby colored exterior that leans a little lighter than a traditional beet. They’re aptly nicknames the candy stripe beet, which refers to both its colors and flavor. Roasting brings out the strongest flavor in the beets, but feel free to steam, braise, or eat them raw. They’re the perfect complement to a variety of cheeses, eggs, bacon, oranges, herbs, and more. Click through for recipe ideas!

Green cabbage is the trusty old standby. We’re all familiar with it, maybe even mistaking it for a head of iceberg lettuce at times. But make no mistake, green cabbage is crunchier, heavier, and more flavorful. Raw, it’s peppery but when sauteed it sweetens. It’ll appear a bit rubbery while raw, but when sliced thin is anything but. It’s also high in folate and calcium, so it’s the perfect pregnancy ingredient. The same goes for those looking for a heart healthy meal, as it’s low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Click through for recipe ideas!

Green cabbage is the trusty old standby. We’re all familiar with it, maybe even mistaking it for a head of iceberg lettuce at times. But make no mistake, green cabbage is crunchier, heavier, and more flavorful. Raw, it’s peppery but when sauteed it sweetens. It’ll appear a bit rubbery while raw, but when sliced thin is anything but. It’s also high in folate and calcium, so it’s the perfect pregnancy ingredient. The same goes for those looking for a heart healthy meal, as it’s low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Click through for recipe ideas!

Don’t be fool by its name. The watermelon radish does look like their namesake with a cool, white skin and, when cut open, a deep pink with a ring of green. But it’s flavor is nothing like the sugary, front of palate bite a watermelon offers. Typically eaten raw, it’s lightly peppery in flavor and nicely complements the sweetness of a beet or apple. Typically, a watermelon radish reaches the size of a baseball and is best sliced thin or diced. A one cup serving is chock full of vitamins A, C, and folate, giving you a lot of bang for your buck in the nutrition department. Click through for recipe ideas!

Don’t be fool by its name. The watermelon radish does look like their namesake with a cool, white skin and, when cut open, a deep pink with a ring of green. But it’s flavor is nothing like the sugary, front of palate bite a watermelon offers. Typically eaten raw, it’s lightly peppery in flavor and nicely complements the sweetness of a beet or apple. Typically, a watermelon radish reaches the size of a baseball and is best sliced thin or diced. A one cup serving is chock full of vitamins A, C, and folate, giving you a lot of bang for your buck in the nutrition department. Click through for recipe ideas!

Crispin apples, sometimes called Mutsu, are a cross between Golden Delicious and Indo apples and sometimes referred to as “the million dollar apple”. They are medium to large apples, making them meaty enough for cooking, juicing, or drying and still easy enough for snacking on the run. They’re tart in flavor with hints of spice and honey. They’re high in soluble fiber--perfect for those looking to lower cholesterol or maintain a healthy weight. Try coring the apple and filling it with brown sugar, nuts, and dried fruit for an easy dessert or simply slice into salad or alongside a cheese board.

Crispin apples, sometimes called Mutsu, are a cross between Golden Delicious and Indo apples and sometimes referred to as “the million dollar apple”. They are medium to large apples, making them meaty enough for cooking, juicing, or drying and still easy enough for snacking on the run. They’re tart in flavor with hints of spice and honey. They’re high in soluble fiber--perfect for those looking to lower cholesterol or maintain a healthy weight. Try coring the apple and filling it with brown sugar, nuts, and dried fruit for an easy dessert or simply slice into salad or alongside a cheese board.

If you’re wondering why your carrots are purple, red, and yellow, here’s the deal. A thousand years ago, carrots were traditionally purple and yellow and now farmers are cultivating these heirloom varieties to offer a more vibrant and nutritious product. The more common orange and tangerine carrots have always been associated with beta-carotene, which promotes good vision. But mixed into the bunch are red carrots rich in prostate-aiding antioxidants, yellow and white that are also associated with eye health, and purple, which increase antioxidants in the bloodstream promoting good brain health.

If you’re wondering why your carrots are purple, red, and yellow, here’s the deal. A thousand years ago, carrots were traditionally purple and yellow and now farmers are cultivating these heirloom varieties to offer a more vibrant and nutritious product. The more common orange and tangerine carrots have always been associated with beta-carotene, which promotes good vision. But mixed into the bunch are red carrots rich in prostate-aiding antioxidants, yellow and white that are also associated with eye health, and purple, which increase antioxidants in the bloodstream promoting good brain health.